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10 Things Scream Does Better Than I Know What You Did Last Summer (& Vice Versa)

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Many people credit the ’90s as being a fun pop culture decade, and it’s true that some beloved horror movies came out of that time period as well. The mid-to-late ’90s brought us Scream (1996) and I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997). These two films are popular teen screams that everyone still has fond feelings about today, and each one has sequels (with varying degrees of success and quality). They are also both written by Kevin Williamson who is also known for creating Dawson’s Creek.

Every horror movie does some things really well and some things not quite so well. Here are five things that Scream does better than I Know What You Did Last Summer and vice versa.

***Also If you havent seen these 90s gems…Do yourself a favor and stop reading….GO watch and then come back and read….There are spoilers ahead******


SCREAM: META HORROR

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At first glance, these two films have a lot in common with one another: they are both from the ’90s and they both feature high school characters and scary scenes. But Scream stands out because of one thing: it’s a meta-horror film. It definitely goes without saying that when it comes to meta-horror, Scream does this so much better than any other movie. It’s what makes this film feel so fresh.

One of the characters, Randy Meeks (Jamie Kennedy), enjoys watching horror movies and has a crazy extensive knowledge of them. Not only that, but he’s pretty obsessed with the “rules” of the horror genre. He often tells the other characters about this, and he’s one reason why Scream is known as a meta-horror movie.


I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER: A LOVE STORY

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It might sound strange that I Know What You Did Last Summer has a love story, but the relationship between Julie James (Jennifer Love Hewitt) and her boyfriend, Ray Bronson (Freddie Prince Jr.), is really sweet. He cares about her and looks out for her and her safety… which is pretty key since the group of friends is being targeted by a killer.

Although Neve Campbell’s protagonist Sidney Prescott has a boyfriend (Billy Loomis, played by Skeet Ulrich), he not only pressures her into being intimate when she’s not ready but (spoiler alert) he ends up being the killer (or one of them). It’s safe to say that wasn’t a great love story.


SCREAM: A GREAT CAST

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The cast of Scream really is amazing. Of course, there’s Neve Campbell, who brings her talents to the girl-next-door role.

Other cast members include Drew Barrymore (whose opening sequence couldn’t possibly be more iconic), Courteney Cox as Gale Weathers, David Arquette as Deputy Dewey, and Rose McGowan as Sidney’s best friend Tatum Riley. Liev Schreiber plays Cotton Weary and even Matthew Lillard shows up as Stuart.


KNOW WHAT YOU DID SUMMER: A STRONGLY TOLD STORY

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Both of these horror movies are about serial killers, but there’s something about the way that I Know What You Did Last Summer tells the tale. Based on the 1973 novel by Lois Duncan, the film follows a group of teenagers who accidentally kill someone… or so they think. He’s not actually dead, he knows what happened, and he’s going after them.

The movie may be a bit cheesy (it was the ’90s, after all) but it’s interesting to watch as he targets each of them and as Julie tries to figure out what’s going on.


SCREAM: THE ICONIC MASK

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The killer in I Know What You Did Last Summer is a fisherman named Ben Willis who wears what looks like a black raincoat. He’s not exactly the most pleasant person around, that’s for sure, but he’s not nearly as iconic as the killer in Scream, Ghostface.

And Ben Willis isn’t as iconic as the mask that Ghostface wears, either. There is a reason why people wear this mask, along with the equally famous black coat, for Halloween year after year. It really wouldn’t feel the same if the mask had been different.


I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER: THE PREMISE IS SCARY

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Scream does have its scary moments, but it’s true that the movie has a fun, campy vibe that doesn’t always lend itself to making audiences cower under a blanket.

The premise of I Know What You Did Last Summer is honestly scary. If anyone puts themselves in the shoes of the main characters, they would think that this is a really unpleasant situation to be in. The idea that you would be walking around your town, trying to live your regular life, all the while knowing that someone was after you is incredibly tough. The killer even gets into the characters’ houses.


SCREAM: WES CRAVEN’S DIRECTION

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Wes Craven is widely considered to be a celebrated and talented director, and he was truly a masterpiece of horror movies. He directed Scream (along with the three sequels) and it is a testament to him that the movie is so good.

The movie’s direction is so flawless. There are many scenes that are beautifully shot, whether the camera is panning around the outside porch of Sidney Prescott’s home or watching the group of teenagers at their high school.


I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER: A BEAUTIFUL SETTING

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Most of the movie takes place in the small town of Southport, North Carolina during the summer. It’s a truly beautiful setting, and while the small town of Scream is nice-looking, it really has nothing on the other film’s atmosphere.

It’s definitely even more chilling to watch a scary story that is set in such an idyllic place since people figure “those types of things never happen here.” As Julie visits her friends or Ray down at the docks, it’s impossible not to get at least a little bit distracted by the scenery.


SCREAM: A TRULY SURPRISING REVEAL

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It’s fair to say that no one saw the ending of Scream coming: that Sidney’s boyfriend Billy was the killer, along with Stu. This is mostly because Sidney truly thought that the man her mom was having an affair with, Cotton Weary, was the one responsible for her death (especially because he had been put in jail for it). Audiences learned that Billy was furious that his dad and Sidney’s mom were actually romantically involved, and he was out for revenge.

There was no real “reveal” at the end of I Know What You Did Last Summer because, well, everyone knew who the killer was. That was the whole point of the story.


I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER: A TWIST ENDING THAT SETS UP THE SEQUEL

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There are many times that a character will be killed off in a horror movie or TV show only to come crawling back because—surprise—they’re not dead at all.

At the end of I Know What You Did Last Summer, Julie is showering at college and then it becomes clear that not only is the killer back, but he’s right there, in the bathroom. This is a twist ending since everyone thought that they would be left alone. It does set up the sequel really nicely.

Marvel Movie Villains Ranked from Worst to Best

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The Marvel movies are beloved the world over, and they are consistent box office and critical hits. But if there’s an Achilles heel to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it’s its villains. They’re not particular good or even interesting. And given how many films they’ve made now, it’s become a bit of a running joke that Marvel’s villains are lackluster. Of course they make up for it in the protagonist department, but that doesn’t mean creating a fascinating Marvel movie villain is impossible. In fact, they’ve come close a few times and there is one indisputable great Marvel movie villain.

So the following list is from worst to best


12. Whiplash – Iron Man 2

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You really can’t blame Jon Favreau and Marvel for wanting Mickey Rourke to play Whiplash in Iron Man 2. At the time, Rourke was in the midst of what would ultimately be an incredibly brief resurgence thanks to his terrific performance in The Wrestler. But when he showed up for Iron Man 2, he basically wore his same clothes off the street, demanded the character have a pet bird, and mumbled his way through the film. Ivan Vanko was supposed to be a formidable foil for Tony Stark that brought up all of Tony’s daddy issues, but Rourke’s performance is so stilted and odd that Vanko/Whiplash just comes off as one big joke. While Iron Man 2 certainly is one of the MCU’s worst films, a lot of the film’s stink is due to this complete dud of an antagonist and Rourke’s unwillingness to give Favreau and Co. anything resembling an actual performance.


11. Emil Blonsky/Abomination – The Incredible Hulk

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The Incredible Hulk is an outlier in the MCU for many reasons—it was produced at the same time as Iron Man, and yet only two characters from Hulk have appeared in any other MCU films. It’s a weird movie that’s kinda-sorta part of the MCU mythology, but as a film itself, it’s pretty forgettable. That extends to its main villain Emil Blonsky (Tim Roth), who in the film is basically just portrayed as a macho military dude who wants to get Hulk-sized ripped. He becomes Abomination because reasons, fights Hulk, and is beaten to a pulp. The end. He really only exists in the film to justify a big third act fist fight between Hulk and a formidable challenger, and as a character is as paper thin as they come.


10 Malekith – Thor: The Dark World

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In the long line of pointless villain roles in the MCU, Christopher Eccleston’s Malekith in Thor: The Dark World ranks as one of the most pointless. Case in point: I bet you forgot/didn’t know Christopher Eccleston was even in a Marvel movie! Malekith is a mean Dark Elf who wants to rule the universe. That’s the beginning and end of his story, and the film makes no efforts to inject any sort of pathos or emotion into the character at all, just using him to get in the way of Thor and Jane. It’s all the more glaring when coming off of Loki in Thor, who was chock full of pathos. But Eccleston’s not alone in the MCU legion of wasted talents.


9. Kaecilius – Doctor Strange

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Mads Mikkelsen dodged a bullet when he passed on the Malekith role in Thor: The Dark World, but he didn’t fare much better by taking on Kaecilius in Doctor Strange instead. Co-writer/director Scott Derrickson admits he chose a simplistic villain given the complexity of the protagonist and mysticism he already had to deal with, and indeed Kaecilius is something of a blank slate. He does get in some great fight sequences, and Mikkelsen looks tremendous when going toe-to-toe with Strange and other characters, but at the end of the film we don’t much care what happens to Kaecilius. He’s more of a pest than a dastardly antagonist, which again given that the script also had to deal with the Ancient One stuff and Strange’s arc is semi-forgivable, but he’s certainly not a memorable entry into the MCU.


8. Alexander Pierce – Captain America: The Winter Soldier

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Captain America: The Winter Soldier is somewhat unique in that it’s one of the more grounded films in the MCU, and Robert Redford’s Alexander Pierce is very much a “suit-and-tie” villain. He has no superpowers or plans to gain superpowers. Instead he’s just an evil Nazi dude who’s trying to keep Hydra’s infiltration of S.H.I.E.L.D. a secret. And he’s…fine. The character is kind of a waste of Redford’s talents and indeed, the film seems to let Redford’s mere presence do a lot of the heavy lifting. But there’s nothing particularly memorable about Alexander Pierce and he hasn’t really made a lasting impact on the MCU, so he’s very much one of the franchise’s middle-of-the-road baddies.


7. Yon-Rogg – Captain Marvel

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There’s a recurring theme in the MCU of “good guys who turn out to be the bad guys,” and while Jude Law‘s Yon-Rogg in Captain Marvel isn’t as forgettable as Yellowjacket, he’s nowhere near as substantial as someone like Ego the Living Planet. Part of that is due to a miscalculation on the part of the Captain Marvel‘s filmmakers and Law’s performance—it’s abundantly clear that he’s a bad dude early on in the film, but the movie wants you to believe he’s an ally to Carol until the third act. Much of Law’s screentime is spent merely talking to Carol via Space Phone and trying to steer her clear of answers, and while one could maybe make the argument that he’s a stand-in for “Man Who Gaslights Woman Then Thinks She Owes Him for Helping Her,” there’s simply not enough for Law to do for the film to really dig into anything of substance.

That’s kind of the give and take of a villain reveal like this, and for his part Ben Mendelsohn is fairly compelling when we’re under the impression that his character Talos is the film’s Big Bad. I will say the larger twist that the entire race of the Kree turn out to be the bad guys while the Skrulls are actually the good guys is an interesting one, as the film examines how meeting and getting to know someone markedly different from you can allow you to see the world from an entirely different point of view (empathy, amirite?). But for the purposes of this list, since Yon-Rogg is technically Captain Marvel‘s villain, he lands towards the back half of the pack.


6. The Winter Soldier – Captain America: The Winter Soldier

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From a physical standpoint, The Winter Soldier/Bucky Barnes is one of the most formidable baddies in the MCU. He’s lead to some of the franchise’s best close-quarters combat scenes and offers an emotional point of conflict with Steve Rogers. But at the end of the day, his motivation in Captain America: The Winter Soldier is simply “I’m brainwashed,” and we really never get to see much of Bucky shining through or reckoning with what’s happened to him, so from an emotional standpoint it’s a bit disappointing. Ultimately, “The Winter Soldier” is a physical obstacle whereas Alexander Pierce plays the more straightforward villain of the story. Regardless, Sebastian Stan’s Bucky is a really strong visual antagonist and the personal connection to Steve Rogers makes the audience investment all the more significant.


5. Ultron – Avengers: Age of Ultron

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Avengers: Age of Ultron is quite one of the weirdest movies Marvel has made thus far, and considering it’s the sequel to their biggest movie, that’s quite a risk. Writer/director Joss Whedon is asking big, difficult, and dark questions with this film concerning parentage and basic humanism, and James Spader’s evil robot Ultron is something of a mouthpiece for these ideas and concerns. Ultron is essentially Tony’s legacy in humanoid form, and this is a story of a son denying his father and carving out a legacy of his own. While the visual design of the character is a bit underwhelming, his motivations and Shakespearean-like dialogue are delectable, and Spader makes a meal of it. That final scene between Ultron and Vision, in which they discuss the value of humanity itself, is something that could only come from the mind of Whedon in the context of a massive blockbuster sequel, and Ultron makes for one of the MCU’s very best baddies.


4. Thanos – Avengers: Infinity War

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Possibly the most important task Avengers: Infinity War had was making Thanos an interesting and formidable villain. The character has been teased as the one pulling the strings since the end of The Avengers, but until Infinity War we had no motivation, no pathos, and certainly nothing to show for it—he had amassed exactly zero Infinity Stones until the events of Infinity War. So did Marvel succeed? Well, kinda.

Some hail Thanos as the best Marvel villain ever, and while I wouldn’t go that far, Infinity War does a fairly compelling job of fleshing Thanos out. Josh Brolin‘s performance has a lot to do with it, as the No Country for Old Men actor brings some much-needed humanity to the character. And there are a couple of scenes designed to flesh Thanos out as an emotional being that sort of work.

His motivation, however, is a bit shaky. Thanos wants to wipe out half the population of the universe, claiming that in doing so he’s sacrificing many to save many. By cutting down on overpopulation, Thanos believes the rest of the universe’s inhabitants will thrive. There are some allusions to Thanos’ backstory as motivation here and there, but ultimately we’re not given a super compelling reason why beyond “Thanos is deadly passionate about his political beliefs.”

There’s also the attempts at pathos with regards to Thanos’ relationship with Gamora, with an entire flashback designed to make the audience see Thanos as an emotional being. While the scene with the soul stone mostly works, ultimately we’re again not given a convincing enough reason as to why Thanos genuinely loves Gamora, especially as he’s simultaneously pulling his other daughter, Nebula, apart.

So yes, Infinity War mostly does a good job of making Thanos at the very least formidable—especially considering how many other characters the film has to juggle.


3. Red Skull – Captain America: The First Avenger

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It’s a shame that Hugo Weaving didn’t seem to enjoy his time in the MCU, because his villainous Red Skull remains one of Marvel’s absolute best antagonists to date. The World War II setting of Captain America: The First Avenger necessitated a period-appropriate villain, and Weaving’s Nazi scientist Red Skull is the perfect fit. Weaving brings a terrifying stoicism and focus to the role that telegraphs Red Skull will let nothing and no one get in his way, and the way he kind of just blows Captain America off sets the tone for their relationship. And while it’d be great to see Weaving reprise the role, perhaps we look back on the character so fondly becausewe’re left wanting more.


2. Killmonger – Black Panther

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Black Panther is Marvel Studios’ most substantial film to date, and it achieved that through the precise, thoughtful, and bold creative vision of co-writer/director Ryan Coogler. That vision wasn’t just one of T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) getting into fisticuffs with a threat to the Wakandan throne, but a story about the African experience contrasted with the African-American experience. The latter is embodied by Michael B. Jordan‘s Erik “Killmonger” Stevens, a Wakandan raised in America—an outsider to his own homeland. This character is written so well, so empathetically that it’s weird to even call him a villain. It’s easy to agree with Killmonger’s motives to share Wakandan technology to help the oppressed people of African decent all over the world, and even though his methods are extreme, you see his point. How rare is it to be moved to tears by a film’s antagonist? But that happens in Black Panther thanks to Jordan’s phenomenal performance and Coogler and Joe Robert Cole‘s pitch perfect screenplay. Honestly, the only reason Killmonger isn’t #1 on this list is because he doesn’t show up until about halfway through the movie. But his impact is deeply felt long after the credits roll.


 

1. Loki – Thor and The Avengers

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But when it comes to the ultimate Marvel villain, come on, it’s Loki. Not a single MCU villain to date comes close to touching the pathos of Tom Hiddleston’s Loki, who basically stole Thor even before he was revealed to be an antagonistic force. We care about Loki, even when he’s doing awful things, and his story is ultimately one of tragedy. That’s what makes him compelling, and that’s what no other Marvel movie has been able to replicate. Granted, Loki got to build his pathos as a friendly face first before being outed as a baddie, but even in The Avengers there’s a dynamism to the performance and the role that makes it utterly watchable. While he’s no longer with us, and while Loki made the turn more towards “good guy” in later MCU films, he remains the most interesting and layered antagonist Marvel has introduced thus far.


 I know there are many more that I didn’t mention, but in the comments let me know your list and what you thought of Endgame (If you seen it)

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Differences Between Jaws the Book and the Film

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Duh-DUM Duh-DUM Duh-DUM….. I love the movie Jaws. I remember when I first saw it at a young age. I was terrified. I still dont like to go into the water. I just finshed the book today and boy-oh-boy what a difference between the book and the movie. 

Jaws is one of the most well known movies of all time, right down to the iconic theme music composed by John Williams. However, there are likely plenty among general audiences out there who don’t know that the 1975 thriller directed by Steven Spielberg was based on a book by Peter Benchley. The book is also called Jaws, but there are quite a few differences between the book and what ended up on the big screen.

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In The Book In The Movie

Chief Brody’s wife has an affair with Hooper.

This doesn’t happen.

Hooper goes into the shark cage to attempt to kill the shark with a boom stick.                             

He wants to use a hypodermic needle to inject the fish with strychnine.                                        

Jaws crushes Hooper’s cage and kills him.

Jaws attempts to crush the cage and gets stuck in it’s remains allowing Hooper to escape and live.

Quint harpoons the shark and then gets his foot tangled in some lines and is pulled under the      water to his death.                                                

Jaws attacks the boat and Quint falls down into his mouth and is eaten.                                             

Each day Body, Quint and Hooper return to shore to try again the next day to kill the shark.

They stay out on the water without returning.

fter being harpooned three times by Quint, Jaws is bearing down on Brody. He waits for certain death, but before the shark can get to him it dies from it’s wound.s

Brody shoves a scuba tank into Jaws’ mouth as it is attempting to kill him. He takes Quint’s rifle and shoots the scuba tank causing an explosion that obliterates the shark.

Mayor Vaughn owes money to the Mafia, who      pressure him to keep the beaches open to keep    real estate prices high.                                          

This isn’t mentioned.                                                  

Deputy Hendricks finds the shark’s tooth in Ben Gardner’s boat and presents it to the mayor.

Matt Hooper finds the tooth while scuba diving in Ben Gardner’s boat, but he looses it when he finds Gardner’s corpse and becomes frightened.

The shark kills an old man shortly after it kills. Alex Kintner                                                           

This doesn’t happen.                                                 

Quint uses other sharks and a dolphin and it’s fetus as bait for the shark.

This doesn’t happen instead he used fish guts.

Martin and Ellen have three sons Billy, Martin Jr. And Shawn.

Martin and Ellen have two sons Michael and Shawn.

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20 Netflix Originals You Need To Binge

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There are a lot of good TV shows on Netflix ,But what’s the best Netflix original series? The streaming service has put more and more emphasis into their own programming over the last few years, and with over 100 Netflix originals — between shows and movies — browsing aimlessly can be daunting. If you’re trying to figure out exactly which original show to watch next, here’s a great place to start with a look at a ranked list of the 20 best Netflix series right now.


Stranger Things

A throwback and love letter to the early 1980s movies of Steven Spielberg and John Carpenter, the Duffer Brothers Stranger Things feels both familiar and new. The first season is about a boy named Will (think E.T.‘s Elliot) who is captured by a The Thing-like creature and trapped in a Poltergeist-like world. His mother (Winona Ryder) recruits the local sheriff to investigate Will’s disappearance. Meanwhile, Will’s dorky, Goonies-like best friends take to their bikes to do some sleuthing of their own and eventually befriend an alien-like girl with telepathic powers (the E.T. of the series). The investigation into Will’s disappearance and the arrival of the telepathic girl all seem to lead back to a power plant operated by a character played by Matthew Modine. It’s great PG horror/sci-fi, like the blockbusters of the early ’80s, but for those who didn’t grow up in the era or aren’t intimately familiar with Amblin Entertainment’s catalog, the series may not hold as much appeal.


Orange is the New Black

Jenji Kohan’s knack for social commentary mixed with humor is perfect for a prison story. Orange Is the New Black is as funny as Weeds in its early years, but Kohan has found a way to infuse poignancy to the overall vibe of her stories. The diverse, engaging ensemble cast is chock-full of fan favorites, and while Orange is the New Black traffics in stereotypes, it also challenges and complicates them. The acting is superb, the writing is brilliant, and the storylines are addictive. More importantly, it forces us to root for people who make poor decisions and appreciate the fact that we all make poor decisions because we’re human. The series will make viewers laugh and think, and every once in a while, it will break viewers’ hearts. It is a smart show, but most of all, it is good, in every sense of the word.

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13 Reasons Why

Whether you’ve read the source material or not, Brian Yorkey’s adaptation of the YA sensation will ensnare you. The saga follows Clay (Dylan Minnette), a loner of a high schooler, as he tries to defog his crush’s mysterious rationale for suicide. (Viewer discretion advised: suicide, drinking, and sexual assault.) The heartbreak is real


Friends From College

This show, from husband and wife duo Nicholas Stoller and Francesca Delbanco, looks like an ensemble comedy, but it’s much more of a fucked-up love story. When you hit play, you’ll meet two cheaters and their friends from Harvard, all of whom make some reaaaaaally bad decisions. If you think the characters are unlikable, that’s the point. This is kind of like the 30-minute dramedy version of the anti-hero story Hollywood has been obsessed with, just with an entire group of morally gray characters. The tone can be confusing at times — you’ll see a few genuinely goofy scenes and then buckets of cringeworthy moments — but the stacked cast and the thought-provoking storylines ultimately deliver.


Tidelands

Sex! Drugs! Mer-people! Australia! There’s a world in which Tidelands, a Netflix original from down under, lives up to its pulpy premise and delivers a fun, fast-paced show. Unfortunately, that’s not this world. For all the mystery, the drug-running, the relationships between the “Tidelanders” (mer-people, more or less) and the average humans, the show plods along more than it should. It plays like a show the CW passed on (albeit with some mild nudity), and while the secrets of the Tidelanders are sufficiently intriguing to move the plot along, but there aren’t enough moments of excitement to make it the an irresistible siren song of a show.

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Sense8

Sense8 was a sens8tion. Perhaps not for everyone, but for enough people that creative duo Lana and Lilly Wachowski’s two-season neon blitz of queerness and sci-fi created a fanbase more loyal than almost any Netflix original series. These fans loved their sensates, who were connected to the audience almost as strongly as they were to each other. That loved the characters so much, in fact, that they were able to push for an epic series finale when it was clear that Netflix wasn’t planning to sustain expensive niche sci-fi shows. With collaborator J. Michael Straczynski, The Matrix creators made a multinational, multiethnic, queer-as-all-hell show jam-packed with diversity on all levels and enough multi-layered plotting to keep the massive cast happy, sexy, and interesting.


Narcos

One popular line of criticism has it that Narcos romanticizes the violence and degradation associated with the Colombian drug wars—and drug culture in general—and I would agree that the excellent Wagner Moura plays kingpin Pablo Escobar so engagingly that he becomes a sort of Walt White-esque antihero. And the rhythms of the documentary-style narration are fast-paced in a way that’s reminiscent of Guy Ritchie, whipping us along at an almost breakneck speed. Nevertheless, this valid criticism misses the important point that we are watching a work of fiction based on historical figures—not a real documentary. And when viewed that way, Narcos is one of the most successful shows on TV, in how it managed to flesh out some very dark characters and tell a complicated story with such urgency and clarity.


Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

After living underground in a cult for 15 years of her life, Kimmy Schmidt is finally exposed to the real world. She decides to make up for her lost years through the cultural, eye-opening streets of New York. Kimmy’s character develops through the help of her new friends– a gay Broadway wannabe, a street-smart landlady and an out-of-touch socialite. Navigate through the streets with Kimmy in this heartwarming and hilarious series. Two big thumbs up to Netflix.

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Dear White People

Deriving from the film, also titled Dear White People, we follow a group of underrepresented students in their fight for racial, social and political equality at the predominantly white Ivy League college of Winchester University. This series is very much relevant in today’s society by harshly, but appropriately addressing the issues revolving around race in the aspects of society and politics. Along with these issues, Dear White People sheds light on gender roles, sexuality and basically the whole rollercoaster of college. Through its blunt reality and crude humor, Dear White People is definitely a must see. #STAYWOKE


Master of None

Aziz Ansari’s Master of None is a post-racial dating and relationship sitcom about millennials. Like the better dating sitcoms of the past, the series still manages to capture the anxieties of dating, of new relationships, and of settling down, only it successfully brings in texting and social media into the mix naturally and without calling attention to itself. It also explores intimacy without resorting to gender stereotypes or relationship clichés. It’s new, and unique, and most of all, it is kind. It’s a good series about genuinely good people, and the chemistry between Ansari’s character and his love interest (Noel Wells) in the first season is electric. It’s not laugh-out-loud funny, but Master of None is funny in its observations, clever in its writing and honest in the depiction of its characters. It’s a truly great sitcom and something of a roadmap to dating for a new generation.

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Peaky Blinders

A British import licensed in America exclusively by Netflix, Peaky Blinders is roughly the UK equivalent of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, taking place in the same time period and covering similar terrain. It’s got British gangsters, and while bootlegging and gambling are involved, so is the IRA, Peaky has one thing that Boardwalk does not, however, and that’s the piercing, intense Cillian Murphy, who plays something akin to Prohibition-era Boyd Crowder. The show also features Tom Hardy as a phenomenal recurring character in seasons two and three (along with Noah Taylor). It’s a short series, and it is addictive, violent, and intense as hell.


The Crown

At once intimate and sweeping, The Crown presents an inside view of the ascension of Queen Elizabeth II, played by Claire Foy, and the first few years of her reign. John Lithgow is featured as the indomitable Winston Churchill, struggling with the ignominy of age at the end of his career. Churchill’s support and mentorship of Elizabeth, despite his limitations, creates an important emotional center around which various historical events turn. Elizabeth’s relationship with her husband, Prince Phillip (Matt Smith) is also wonderfully explored; his role as consort is one that he by turns delights in and rebels against. The production spared no expense in painstakingly recreating the physical environments and rigid protocols that constrained and defined the royal family. The challenges posed by modernity and the post-colonial period are filtered through the Palace’s political structure, in which despite her role, Elizabeth’s personal needs and wishes are continually subsumed to protocol and appearance. This series will appeal to anyone who enjoys costume drama, but it is also a fascinating exploration of the post-WWII period and the development of a monarch who managed to maintain and even expand the popularity and stability of the British Monarchy against significant odds.


Bloodline

While the second season doesn’t quite live up to the near-perfect first, that freshman outing offers slow-burning greatness, doling out revelations about the Rayburn family incrementally. The series follows the Rayburn siblings, John (Kyle Chandler), Meg (Linda Cardellini), Kevin (Norbert Leo Butz) and Danny, portrayed by the Emmy-nominated Ben Mendelsohn, who gives one of this decade’s best television performances It’s Danny who’s the powder keg, the black-sheep brother who returns home to hotel business and upends the entire family, outing their secrets and putting them all in danger. Bloodline is a stressful series. It seems designed not to entertain, but to give viewers a panic attack. It’s a series that demands to be binged, not because the viewer wants to find out what’s next so much as not pushing through means living with these characters’ anxiety that much longer.

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You

Gossip Girl’s Penn Badgley returns as a scumbag we can’t help but swoon over in this Lifetime drama that’s now been handed off to the streaming platform. Badgley plays Joe Goldberg, a seemingly-sweet guy who works at a bookshop in the city and courts a beautiful blonde named Beck (Elizabeth Lail). Unfortunately, that’s where the rom-com portion of this thriller ends. You see, Joe’s “courting” includes stalking the object of his affections, breaking into her apartment, holding her boyfriend hostage, and peeping in on her most intimate of moments. And that’s only in the first episode. If anything, this show is proof that the modern dating world can be a terrifying hellscape.


One Day at a Time

A remake of a 1970s sitcom produced by 94-year-old iconic television producer Norman Lear, One Day at a Time manages to not only match its predecessor but miraculously improve upon it. This updated version centers on a Cuban America family headed by a single mom (Justina Machado) raising three kids with the help of her mom (Rita Moreno). It’s broad jokes and laugh track feels somewhat out of place on the streaming service, but the jokes still land and more importantly, the characters connect in an honest way as they attempt to live on a modest nurse’s salary and maintain their Cuban heritage while adapting to modern progressivism (much like Fresh Off the Boat). It’s more poignant sitcom than it is funny, but it’s a warm, loving look at difficulties of single parenting that resonates as much in 2017 as it did in the ’70s.


House of Cards

The highly bingeable political series is the grandfather of Netflix original programming, and now with five seasons under its belt, it’s had a lot of highs and plenty of lows. The first season is impeccable, as we see the beginning of Frank Underwood’s ascent to power from Speaker of the House to eventual President of the United States. The series, however, hits some rough spots, especially in season three when Underwood and his wife Clare (Robin Wright) turn against each other. The series is best when the two are working together.It’s beginning to run out of political room to maneuver. Still, the series is never short on twists, turns, and the occasional huge surprise. The supporting cast — which includes Molly Parker, Michael Kelly, Reg E. Cathey, Constance Zimmer, and Corey Stoll, among others — is always excellent, even if their storylines often run into dead ends.After former star Kevin Spacey’s alleged sexual misconduct against 15 accusers, and replacing him with his wife, Claire (Robin Wright), which leads to one of the most misconceived denouements one could imagine for a series of its profile.

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Grace And Frankie

Grace And Frankie‘s first season started streaming on Netflix back in 2015 and the third season was recently added to the streaming service. This series is super hilarious and is not to be missed. When their husbands share that they are in love with each other, the two women become unlikely and surprising friends. They accept each other’s differences and their own and it is a really charming story. This unlikely duo deal with circumstances that you would probably expect in an old-school sitcom but with a new, modern approach. Plus there is the fact that the actors are top-notch, from Jane Fonda to Lily Tomlin to Sam Waterston to Martin Sheen. So guess what you are going to be doing this week? Watching Grace And Frankie! What would you do if you were in their situation? That is something that you are going to be asking yourself!


Girlboss

Following the inspiring book by Sophia Amoruso, #Girlboss is a comedic series that is one of Netflix’s latest originals. Her story inspires young girls and women who want to do more with their life and is an empowering look at not giving up on your dreams. Sophia Amoruso has seriously gone through hell and back to start her business and she has so many amazing stories that have changed her life for the better and she has been a huge inspiration for many who want to do the same. She managed to take her career from nothing to something and it is really awesome. We are very excited to see this series which premiered on April 21st, 2017 (if you haven’t already watched, what are you waiting for?). Based on the trailer alone, it looks like you’ll be inspired and also laughing since this show is definitely super funny. It’s the perfect balance in our minds.


The Get Down

There’s a ton of hype around this Netflix original and for good reason. The Get Downis a short series that focuses on the life of youth detaching from the typical disco scene and trying to make it in the MC rapping world in an era where this type of musical expression wasn’t even valid unless you were performing in an underground community. While you might think this show isn’t for you just because it’s a musical drama, you would be totally wrong! This series takes its musical concept and completely shapes it in a brand new way. So you can definitely curl up on the couch and get started on your binge. Get ready to get down to the amazing music throughout this series! You will be so glad that you gave this one a try and will soon be telling all your friends about it.


Mindhunter

The name and the description may have you assuming that this is a typical network procedural: FBI agents interview psychopaths in order to catch murderers. But Mindhunter is as much Mad Men as it is Law & Order. Produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron, the story follows two real-life agents, Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff, the original King George III in Hamilton on Broadway) and Bill Tench (Holt McCallany), along with consulting psychologist Dr. Wendy Carr (Anna Torv) in the FBI’s nascent Behavioral Science Unit. Joe Penhall’s series is based on a similarly titled true crime book. Interviewing and cataloguing convicted serial killers (a phrase the trio invents) leads to them helping on active cases, but it also affects each of their personal lives in different ways. Cameron Britton is particularly unforgettable as notorious murderer and necrophiliac Edmund Kemper

 

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Featured

My Favorite Movies from Every Year I’ve Been Alive

Here is my top movie from every year I’ve been alive (1988-Current). I’ve been alive for some pretty awesome movies! How many have you seen? (holy shit this was hard)

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1988

Die Hard

1989

National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation

1990

GoodFellas

1991

New Jack City

1992

Aladdin

1993

Jurassic Park

1994

Speed

1995

Bad Boys

1996

Twister

1997

Scream 2

1998

Can't Hardly Wait

1999

The Mummy

2000

Bring It On

2001

Training Day

2002

My Big Fat Greek Wedding

2003

Elf

2004

The Day After Tomorrow

2005

Mr. & Mrs. Smith

2006

The Devil Wears Prada

2007

American Gangster

2008

The Dark Knight

2009

Avatar

2010

The Town

2011

Rise of the Planet of the Apes

2012

The Avengers

2013

The Heat

2014

Whiplash

2015

Southpaw

2016

Sausage Party

2017

It

2018

Black Panther

2019

Well It’s only March and I’ve ony seen 1 movie so far this year. I will come back in December to tell you my favorite movie of the year. 

This list was really really hard. 

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